The Indian Ocean has a spot with lower gravitational pull. Researchers think they know why.

The Indian Ocean has a spot with lower gravitational pull. Researchers think they know why.

– Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science used supercomputers to run simulations and found that the geoid low formed when sinking slabs from a prehistoric ocean reached the Earth's mantle and created plumes.

– Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science used supercomputers to run simulations and found that the geoid low formed when sinking slabs from a prehistoric ocean reached the Earth's mantle and created plumes.

– The mantle, the layer between the Earth's core and outer crust, went through a convection process similar to boiling water, where hot material rises and cold material sinks, leading to the formation of the geoid low.

– The Earth's interior is not a perfectly-shaped sphere; it has lumps called geoids, with variations in gravity caused by different materials.

The formation of the Indian Ocean Geoid Low is partly attributed to a prehistoric ocean called the Tethys Ocean

– which disappeared as India split from the southern hemisphere and moved northward, colliding with Asia to form the Himalayas.

The study has limitations due to uncertainties in replicating the Earth's conditions millions of years ago,

– but it emphasizes the importance of understanding Earth's interior for gaining insights into our planet.

– Ghosh highlights that we know more about the surfaces of distant stars than about the Earth's interior, making it crucial to explore and understand our planet's geological processes.